Sermon Library (Page 2)

Sermon Library (Page 2)

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When Justice is Delayed…Endlessly

Acts 24:1-27 In this week’s text we continue the theme of “Paul and politicians.” Last week we observed how a Roman tribune, who was governed by rules of law, was the instrument God used to rescue Paul from three riots and transport him safely to Caesarea. Having been escorted by half of the Roman garrison in Jerusalem must have encouraged Paul that God was confirming his promise that he would soon testify to God in Rome. But in Caesarea Paul’s hopes are dashed when his case is turned over to Felix, the Roman governor. Felix has no interest in being a servant to the people nor in justice. Rather than giving a ruling on Paul’s case, he vacillates, postpones, manipulates and finally puts his ruling on hold endlessly. What do followers of Jesus do when faced with corrupt officials and the justice due us is delayed with no end in sight?

Paul and Politicians: Before the Sanhedrin

Acts 22:30-23:35 How ought we think about how we relate to structures of power in society? If Jesus is reigning as Lord of the world, what does that imply about how we relate to the authority structures in society? Both Paul and Peter seem to be very clear in their writings that we are to “be subject to the governing authorities” (Rom 13:1-5; 1 Pet 2:13-15). But is it really that simple? What happens when those institutions become corrupt instruments of evil and our submission enables further injustice? In the aftermath of WWII, we condemned those who carried out Hitler’s abominations with the excuse that they were just doing what they were told. So there must be more to our responsibility to governing authorities than mere submission. This Sunday we will get a glimpse at how Paul thought about the structures of power in society, and discover how the kingdom advances in a very imperfect and, in some cases, corrupt world. Acts 22:30-23:35

Riot, Arrest and Defense in the Temple

Acts 21:27-22:29 Having completed our series “Does it Matter,” we will now turn our attention back to the hair-raising drama in the book of Acts, which by divine coincidence puts flesh and blood on many of the themes we explored over the summer. If you were with us in the spring, you may remember Paul’s boundless energy, evangelizing and planting churches throughout most of Asia Minor and Greece. But when Paul arrives in Jerusalem, his whole career abruptly changes. He is assaulted, arrested, brought to trial and endures five trials that transport him from Jerusalem to Caesarea and finally to Rome. Paul the evangelist now becomes Paul the apologist, giving a defense concerning the revelation he has received and the integrity of his character. The fact that Luke devotes six chapters (nearly 200 verses) to these trials is a clue to their theological importance both then and now. Perhaps we should title this section, “Do Apologetics Matter?”

Does Community Matter?

As humans, we long for community, a place of belonging and connectedness. However, these longings are being eroded by a culture that does not make time or create space for deeper relationships. Instead of togetherness there is an increasing sense of isolation and loneliness. The influences of the culture seep into the church. Authentic spiritual community is more difficult to find. Our souls suffer and God’s presence in the world is diminished. This Sunday we conclude the summer series by exploring the question, Does Community Matter?

Does Church Matter?

Church used to be part of the fabric of American life. But, especially in the Bay Area, it is now generally assumed that people do not attend church; we are in one of the least-churched areas of the country. Technology has made it easier for Christians to skip church: you can stream a church service online while drinking coffee at home, or catch a sermon podcast later after going to the beach. So does church still matter? Or is it in an anachronism in today’s society? What is church and why do we “do” church?

Do Missions Matter?

The gospel is the good news of what God has done in Christ. It is good news for us, and we receive it as true. Is it also good news and true for the world around us? We live in a multicultural, pluralistic age and location where diversity, acceptance and tolerance are promoted. How do we bear witness to the truth in such a world? God sent his Son into this world on a mission: to proclaim the good news, and to be the good news. Now we too are sent into the world around us on a mission: to be witnesses to the good news of Jesus.

Does Sabbath Matter?

Living in our Silicon Valley culture today we can find ourselves so easily driven, distracted and feeling depleted as a result. How do we sustain our life with God so that we can thrive and not just survive? The art and practice of learning how to catch our breath become invaluable and essential for us all.

Does Marriage Matter?

This Sunday we turn our attention to the topic of marriage. In a day and age where so much continues to change with regards to relationships and commitment, does marriage still matter? Seeing that the bookends of the Bible include the biblical picture of marriage it seems safe to assume that in God’s eyes, marriage most definitely matters. This Sunday we will re-ground ourselves in the love Jesus, our heavenly groom, has for us all, whether married or single, divorced or widowed. We will remind ourselves that his way of loving, selflessly and sacrificially, is the model we are to follow in all our relationships, not least of which is the marriage between a husband and wife.

Does Jesus Matter?

John 14:6 This Sunday we continue in our summer series, “Does IT Matter?” Only this week, the ‘it’ is a person. It’s Jesus. The one who claimed to be the Son of God. The one who claimed to be “the way the truth and the life.” The one who claimed to be “the resurrection and the life.” Anyone who makes such bold claims which results in countless people believing and following Him as a result… yes, Jesus certainly matters. Come this Sunday as we explore why Jesus matters in our world today, 2000 years after He lived, died, rose, and ascended.

Does Matter Matter?

Gen 1 and 2 Humanity is made in the image of God, meaning we are his reflection and his representation on this earth. It also means that we have been given a responsibility. In Genesis 1, God saw that his creation was “very good,” then passes the baton to humanity to steward it on his behalf. What does that really mean, and what are the implications for our life? That’s what we will explore this Sunday.

Does Being Human Matter?

Does Being Human Matter? Genesis 1:26-27 This week we begin our summer series called “Does it matter?” For the next eight weeks, we will explore eight topics that our culture sometimes influences us to regard as insignificant. However, we want to show that each of these topics matter tremendously to God, and therefore should matter tremendously to us. So, does being human matter? In many ways, this topic is a foundation for everything else in life. And, what we find in Genesis is the radical truth that every single person is made in God’s image! It’s a radical concept, but what does it really mean, and what are the implications for our life? That’s what we will explore this Sunday.

Why is Coming Home So Difficult?

Acts 21:1-26 In our text this week, Paul makes his historic return to Jerusalem. Historic because he has representatives from all the churches he has planted traveling with him, along with a significant amount of money collected from each church for the poor in Jerusalem. The gifts are the first fruits of his ministry among the Gentiles and symbolize the unity of the church. Like a college graduate returning home, not just with a degree, but with money to pay his parent’s back for his or her education, one would think the homecoming would be one of unadulterated joy. But there are disturbing warnings in every port that serious trouble awaits him, but Paul refuses to be deterred. The text addresses some key questions: How do we discern God’s will when both parties believe the Spirit is guiding them? And why is “coming home” often so difficult?