Sermons on John

Sermons on John

We Mourn

Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted. Matt 5:4; John 11 Please join us this Sunday as the pastoral staff has decided to do a lament service in light of the recent tragedies.

The Way, The Truth and The Life

John 14:4-6 We return to our studies in the Gospel of John this Sunday where Jesus makes maybe his most audacious claim yet. He says he is the way, the truth and the life. Notice he doesn’t say he is a way, a truth and a life. He says he is the way, the truth and the life.” He even says he is the only way to the Father. These are indeed enormous claims! Join us this Sunday as we explore these bold claims.

Preparing for the Wedding

John 14:1-3 We continue our studies in the Gospel of John this Sunday in the upper room where love continues to be the central theme. From the words of institution celebrating the love revealed at the cross, to the washing of feet celebrating the love of service, to the new commandment celebrating the “just as Jesus” kind of love, this week we will celebrate the love of marriage. Specifically, we will celebrate the deep love of Jesus, the bridegroom, for the church, his bride. Jesus will go to prepare a place in his Father’s house, and when he is ready, he will come back and take his bride to be with him where he is. Join us this Sunday as we explore some of the most wonderful promises in all of Scripture.

Love Just as I Love

John 13:21-38 As we enter back into John 13 this week, we join the disciples in an upper room in downtown Jerusalem on the night before Jesus goes to the cross. Jesus astonishingly begins this final teaching by serving his disciples in the act of washing their feet. Next, Jesus will explain this act even more, but framed in the language of love, and not just any kind of love, a “just as” kind of love. What is even more astonishing is that this teaching happens in the context of heart-wrenching rejection. Join us this Sunday as we explore this “just as” kind of love.

All The Way To The End

On Sunday we welcome a guest preacher, Iain Provan, Old Testament Professor at Regent College Vancouver, who will meet next week with our pastors for their annual retreat. David began the beloved Twenty-third Psalm, “The Lord is my shepherd.” A thousand years later Jesus said, “I am the good shepherd. Psalm 23 and John 10:7-15 The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep” (John 10:11). The earliest Christian art depicted Jesus as the Good Shepherd caring for his sheep.

People of the Towel

John 13:1-20 We return to our studies in the Gospel of John this Sunday, a Gospel that invites us to Come and See who Jesus really is. Our text this week is the well-known text of Jesus washing the feet of his disciples. Would it be even more well-known, because it is in this scene where Jesus turns everything upside-down. He defines Lordship (even deity!) in terms of a towel, then defines what it means to be people of the towel. Join us this Sunday as we explore the foot-washing event by the foot-washing Lord.

Love Made from Scratch

John 1:1-18 Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” The Apostle John never met Carl Sagan – but when it comes to God’s love, he was in full agreement! God loved us “from scratch”! Come find out this second Sunday of the Advent season what that means for us and for our families as we look at the beginning of John’s Gospel together.

Thankful to be Swimming with Elephants

John 1-12 The Gospel of John is like a pool that is “shallow enough for a child to wade and deep enough for an elephant to swim.” As we enter into the Thanksgiving holiday, we are thankful to be swimming with elephants in the Gospel of John. In the past two years, we have explored chapters one to twelve of this Gospel. And, what we have seen is the unparalleled majesty of Jesus. Indeed, no one has ever said the things he said, and no one has ever done the things he’s done. And, through it all, we’ve discovered how thankful we are for who Jesus is and what he has done! “We give thanks to the Lord for he is good, his steadfast love endures forever” (Ps 136:1). Join us this Sunday as we review some of the highlights from the first twelve chapters of John, while combining the service with elements from our typical Thanksgiving service.

Love’s Last Appeal

John 12:23-50 Two weeks ago, we saw Jesus enter Jerusalem, the text we associate with Palm Sunday. Jesus publicly claims kingship, but in an upside-down way. He rides on a donkey demonstrating his humility, gentleness, and desire for peace. That text ended with some Greeks saying they wanted to see Jesus, meaning they want to know what Jesus is all about. In response, Jesus gives his final public appeal for belief in him and his kingship, our text for this Sunday. This is love’s last appeal, summarized best in the phrase “a grain of wheat” (John 12:24). Join us this Sunday as we explore the final public appeal from Jesus in the book of John.

The True King Comes

John 12:12-22 Jesus now enters Jerusalem as the great king. However, he rides on a donkey, not a war horse. He is not surrounded by an army or by captured slaves, and yet, the crowds still lay down palm branches and shout “Hosanna.” They think he will be a national liberator. Yet he rides in on a donkey, fulfilling Zechariah’s prophecy as one who brings “peace to the nations,” not who conquers the nations (Zech 9:10). Indeed, here comes our king, and he will be a kind of king the world has never seen. Join us this Sunday as we celebrate Palm Sunday in October.

Extravagant Devotion

John 12:1-11 In John 12, Jesus goes back to the place of hostility, to Bethany near Jerusalem, where he has an intimate meal with his friends Mary, Martha and Lazarus. In the middle of dinner, Mary anoints Jesus’ feet with very expensive perfume, worth an entire year’s wages. Out of extravagant love, joy and thanksgiving for Jesus, Mary acts with abandon in her worship of him, and she fills the entire house with the aroma of life. Authentic worship of Jesus, our Savior and King, is never merely private. It always spills over onto others. Join us this Sunday to explore this amazing scene.

The Ugliness of Religion

John 11:45-57 This week we see the fallout of the raising of Lazarus, and it is not good. The Religious Authorities meet to decide the fate of Jesus. And what we see are defining characteristics of “religion,” and they are ugly: a desire for power, a desire for control and a desire to exalt self. John interprets the response of the Religious Authorities by pointing us in the right direction, we are not children of religion, rather we are “children of God.” Over against the ugliness of religion, we are invited into a beautiful relationship of love as children of a good, good father.